Toenail Stopped Growing? Here’s What To Do

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Human nails are the equivalent to other animals’ claws. The robust protective protein known as alpha-keratin, a polymer, is what makes up fingernails and toenails.

Your toes are protected by crucial defensive plates called toenails, which help prevent injuries like cuts and scrapes. While our toenails develop just like our fingernails do, they do so considerably more slowly. 

But what do you do when your toenail stopped growing? Read more to find out.

A toenail can take up to a year and a half to grow from root to tip since it only grows 1 millimeter per month.

Aging and poor circulation can both have an impact on nail development.


The Structure Of A Toenail

Source: Wikipedia

A toenail has four major parts:

Root

This part of the nail presents as a white crescent under the nail and the skin. The nail bed and the nail comprise the rot of the toenail.

Nail Bed

This contains the melanin-producing blood vessels, nerves, and the body. The nail bed contributes material to the base of the nail as it thickens when the nail root grows.

Nail Plate 

This is the actual fingernail. It is made of translucent keratin. Its grooves aid in holding it to the nail bed.

The Cuticle

This water-resistant layer separates the finger’s epidermis from the nail plate.


My Toenail Stopped Growing! Why?

For your toenails to grow straight and even, there is a need for proper blood circulation around your feet and legs. Sadly, artery obstructions can lead to many symptoms, including slow toenail development. The nails may grow very slowly or cease to grow altogether due to a deficiency of oxygen and other nutrients.

The nails may grow very slowly or cease to grow altogether due to a deficiency of oxygen and other nutrients.

Under the nail bed are tiny blood vessels known as capillaries. For nails to develop, the capillaries require a healthy blood supply. These capillaries are what give your toenails their pinkish tint.

Light pink, not gray or purple, should be the color of healthy toenails. If you see a milky white or yellow cast under your nail, you’ve probably got toenail fungus, which can impact the growth rate.

Your toenail may initially appear to be growing less swiftly than it used to — toenails grow so slowly it can be hard to tell! If you’re concerned, you should keep track of the growth by taking photos every few days for a few weeks to see what’s going on.

Toenails frequently don’t develop properly as plaque buildup progresses. If you’ve seen this development, it’s critical to consult a vascular specialist immediately to review your toenail not growing therapy choices.


Other Reasons Why Your Toenails May Have Stopped Growing

It may be a sign that your toenails’ growth is slowing or stopped entirely if you’ve observed that you haven’t needed to cut or trim them in a few months. Your body may be trying to tell you that something is wrong if your toenails aren’t developing by doing this.

Your body may be trying to tell you that something is wrong if your toenails aren’t developing by doing this.

Toenails that don’t seem to grow may be brought on by conditions other than peripheral artery disease, although it’s crucial to be aware of these conditions:

  • Paralysis/Spinal injuries
  • Injured nail bed
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Radiation/Chemotherapy (cancer treatments)
  • Fungal infections

After ruling out the illnesses mentioned above, poor circulation can be the cause.

Fortunately, a couple of other signs can assist in determining whether peripheral artery disease is the root of the problem.


What Is An Ingrown Toenail?

A frequent condition known as an ingrown toenail occurs when the corner or side of the toenail develops into tender flesh. Pain, swollen, irritated skin, and occasionally an infection are the consequences.

Usually, the big toe is impacted by ingrown toenails.

Ingrown toenails are typically treatable on your own (take a look at our review of the CurveCorrect system here). If the discomfort is significant or spreading, your doctor can take action to ease your suffering and assist you in avoiding ingrown toenail issues.

You are more likely to experience ingrown toenail issues if you have diabetes or any other condition that reduces the blood supply to your feet.

You are more likely to experience ingrown toenail issues if you have diabetes or a condition that reduces the blood supply to your feet.


What To Do If Your Toenails Stop Growing

If your toenails stop growing or start growing unusually slowly, there are a few steps that you can take to speed up their growth.

There is no known method to increase the speed of nail growth. To give the nails the best chance for healthy growth and appearance, various therapies can strengthen them and keep them from breaking.

Here are some steps you can take to ensure remedy for your poor or non-existent toenail growth:

1. Keeping The Nails Dry

The nails may become brittle and fragile as a result of water damage. After swimming or taking a shower, always completely dry your nails.

When doing tasks or activities involving water, it is a good idea to wear protective footwear. Doing this can avoid having chlorinated water or cleaning agents rest on the nails.

2. Filing and Grooming

Keep the nails filed into a squared or rounded form to avoid snagging and breaking.

3. Massage 

Diabetes and other medical problems that restrict blood flow to the nails might weaken them. Toenail damage is most likely to result from this. To counteract the effects of diabetes and other circulatory problems, gentle massage can encourage blood flow to the nails.

4. Avoid Harsh Polish Removers

Because it might dry up and weaken the nails, you should avoid acetone polish remover. At least for a while, it is best to avoid nail polishes that need acetone for removal.

Avoid immersing the nails in acetone if it’s your only choice. Instead, scrub the toenails with the polish remover before washing and moisturizing them completely.

Because it might dry up and weaken the nails, you should avoid acetone polish remover.

Also avoid acrylic toenails or press-on nails for toes, at least for a while. Get your natural toenail back on track before you cover it over with a false nail that could lead to infection.

5. Manage Medical Conditions Properly

 Several illnesses, including diabetes and psoriasis, can impact your skin and nails. Anyone suffering from these diseases ought to get medical attention. Following a doctor’s treatment advice could make your skin and nails look better.

It’s crucial to visit a doctor if symptoms alter or worsen. This also holds if the person has a long-term illness that starts to affect their nails.


Conclusion

If you observe that your toenails have stopped growing, it is not a sign of good health, and you ought to ensure that your nails are growing as they ought.

If you try any of the methods above and do not see results, you should see a doctor to get treatment recommendations.

Written by Kayla Young

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