Can You Put Eyeshadow On Your Waterline? Is It Bad?

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Eyeshadow is a cosmetic used on the eyelids to draw attention to your eyes and make them into deep pools of intrigue. Eyeshadow can be used on the brow bones, under the eyes, and on the cheeks.

But is it bad to put eyeshadow on your waterline? The long and short of it is yes, it’s a bad idea to put eyeshadow on your waterline, particularly if you’re doing it regularly.

We’ll explain below.


What Is The Waterline?

Your waterline is the rim of your upper eyelid or the lower one between your eyelashes and the eye.

It’s that little bit of skin between your eyelash and your eye.

Many times, people use eyeshadow/eyeliner on this part of their eye to create a look that can be described as smokey or to make the eyes look bolder and more prominent.

If you’re one of them, you should reconsider your makeup routine.


Is It Bad To Put Eyeshadow on Your Waterline?

If we are honest, putting eyeshadow on your waterline can look cute when applied carefully. However, its effects are not so cute. 

Whether it’s winged or smeared, eyeliner can completely transform your appearance and appearance. It might be difficult to determine which eyeliner look is right for you.

Still, because of social media, we have access to a plethora of eyeliner tricks, and there are many wonderful eyeliners for beginners.

Eye doctors are militating against using eyeshadow on the waterline, and for good reasons too. Because there are specific glands that create and expel oil, eye experts do not recommend applying eyeshadow to your eye’s waterline.

Because there are specific glands that create and expel oil, eye experts do not recommend applying eyeshadow to your eye’s waterline.

Essentially, eyeliner can obstruct the microscopic glands in your lower lash line, preventing your eyes from receiving the regular amount of hydration from the oils the glands produce. The glands will become obstructed over time, which might cause problems.

A recent study by a reputable medical journal has also shown that eyeshadow and other eye makeup has the propensity to contaminate the eye, especially when applied close to the eye. This is made even worse if you’re using old and expired eyeshadow.

The waterline is the closest point to your eye (unless you plan to draw on your cornea!).

The worst effect of coloring too closely to your eye may be some momentary glitter in your vision; however, it’s unclear what long-term impacts there may be.

A recent study by a reputable medical journal has also shown that eyeshadow and other eye makeup has the propensity to contaminate the eye, especially when applied close to the eye.

However, the FDA warns that outdated cosmetics could get contaminated with pathogens and cause an eye infection.


Eyeshadow Types

Powders

A pressed powder is undoubtedly the most traditional option for eyeshadow. You’ll most likely see this brand standard when you stroll into a makeup store or along the beauty section at your local drugstore. While pressed eyeshadow powders are most common, loose powder colors are also available.

You can use fingers or brushes to apply powders, but keep in mind that you can contaminate the powder with dirty fingers. Using a damp brush, you can intensify the colors or make them into liner shades.

Powders can have a lot of staying power and be quite pigmented, so they seem natural on all skin tones, depending on the quality.

Creams

A gel-based eyeshadow is a terrific option if you’re searching for something easier to work with, including ones you can apply, like powders.

Typically, these shadows are done with a brush, fingertips, or a blending sponge. They’re also sometimes offered as eyeshadow crayons or pencils, making application a lot easier. 

One negative is that if you do not prime properly, this shadow medium is more likely to wrinkle. Those that have oily skin and lids, on the other hand, may need to do more prep work to keep colors from moving throughout the day.

Glosses

Glosses are sometimes referred to as “eye gloss” or even “lid lacquer,” depending on the brand. A lid gloss, like ultra-gloss lip color, is intended to give your lids a high-wattage shine. We can use fingers or a brush to apply them.

If you prefer a glossy finish over typical eyeshadows, these products are available in several colors as well as a clear alternative.

One disadvantage of this eyeshadow is that, depending on the type of gloss you choose, it can often seem like you have something on your eyes.

Eyeshadow glosses have the toughest learning curve of all the alternatives because it’s easy to apply too much and finish up looking greasy instead of on-trend.

Eyeshadow glosses have the toughest learning curve of all the alternatives because it’s easy to apply too much and finish up looking greasy instead of on-trend.


Best Way To Apply Eyeshadow

So much depends on what makes you feel most at ease and which tools provide you with the most accuracy for your skillset.

Some people prefer to apply shadows with their fingers, while others prefer the sharpness of brushes. Similarly, if you like to apply eyeshadow to areas other than your lids, you might discover that blending sponges work just as well.

Essentially, the “best” solution is the one that works best for you and the look you’re going for. We’ve discussed eyeshadow techniques in the following articles:


Final Thoughts

So can you put eyeshadow on your waterline? It’s best to avoid doing that. You can dry out your eyes too much.

In any event, this study serves as a reminder that the boundary between the eye and the eyelid is fuzzier than it appears when drawn on.

The further away you draw the eyeliner from your eye, the safer you’ll be.

Written by Kayla Young

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