Is La Roche Posay Cruelty-Free?

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If you have sensitive skin that is prone to redness, allergies and/or signs of aging, then you are probably aware of the La Roche Posay, which is an award-winning brand recommended by dermatologists that also includes a popular sunscreen range.

If you have sensitive skin that is prone to redness, allergies and/or signs of aging, then you are probably aware of the La Roche Posay, which is an award-winning brand recommended by dermatologists that also includes a popular sunscreen range.

You may even use La Roche Posay products yourself. But you may also wonder if the products from this well-known French company are suitable for you to use, especially if you’re vegetarian or vegan.

So, is La Roche Posay cruelty-free? Long story short: the company says it is, but others disagree. We’ll go into the details below.


Is La Roche Posay Cruelty-Free?

According to La Roche Posay itself, it is the number one dermatologist-recommended skincare brand worldwide. Beyond North America and Europe, the French brand is also sold in Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia.

Although the La Roche Posay brand, which is owned by skincare behemoth L’Oreal, claims that it is not complicit in testing its products on animals, it is not considered cruelty free by certification bodies like PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies or Leaping Bunny.

So, why the confusion on this subject?

Well, although La Roche Posay may indeed not test its products on animals during their development, it does allow regulatory bodies in other countries to do so, if it is required for their products to be sold in that country.

Typically, this wouldn’t be an issue.

However, it is an issue when it comes to China, where the company sells its range of dermatologically-tested skincare.

This hypocrisy may very well lead those who are vegan or vegetarian to now think twice about using La Roche Posay skincare, as many feel that La Roche Posay is taking profits while turning a blind eye to animal cruelty.

And unfortunately, even though China apparently changed its rule on animal testing of products in May of last year, very few companies that actually sell skincare in the country fall into this exemption.

And if they do, there are many regulatory hurdles that the brand must overcome in order to get the exemption.

So, basically, animal testing in China isn’t banned, which means that La Roche Posay cannot claim to be a cruelty-free brand.

Overall, this means any imported skincare product into China, will probably be tested on animals at some point, even if they were cruelty-free in the manufacturing process.

Overall, this means any imported skincare product into China, will probably be tested on animals at some point, even if they were cruelty-free in the manufacturing process.

Why do big skincare companies allow this?

Well, because China is a massively lucrative market, it all comes down to the revenue generated. This is especially important to a giant corporation like L’Oreal, which is known the world over.

Most well-known skincare brands are desperate for that market share, and so will bend the rules to appease Chinese regulation, instead of what is morally right, or what its customers value. Of course, some companies don’t do this, such as The Ordinary and Tatcha, but many others do.

According to L’Oréal’s website, it “has been committed to working alongside the Chinese authorities for more than 10 years and scientists to have alternative testing methods recognized, and enable the cosmetics regulation to evolve towards a total and definite elimination of animal testing”.


Conclusion

However, to this day, working alongside the Chinese regulatory authorities hasn’t stopped the skincare products under its corporate umbrella to be sold without animal testing. Therefore, La Roche Posay cannot claim to be cruelty-free.

This means it’s up to you and your values whether or not you decide to use La Roche Posay products for your skincare needs.

Written by Kayla Young

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